Autistic curse: “May your food be ‘new and improved’”

Found the above witticism here on Twitter, by a person named Rory, who also remarked, "These words have destroyed so many of my same foods" and then gave some examples.

I certainly don't like it when my favorite foods are "new and improved."

Comments

  • HylianHylian Citizen, Mentor
    I can handle when things taste different (at least as an adult), but if something is suddenly a different texture I want to gag and can't eat it. I also don't like when I eat things and feel a different texture in them like ground meat, bones in fish, etc.
  • verityverity Administrator, Citizen
    edited October 13
    I haven't seen that for a while. It must have gone out fashion in marketing where I am, or the food I eat doesn't have this on their packaging. I think it is more common on non-food items. "new and improved formula".

    Generally such a phrase in food means they have cut costs, and UK/Irish consumers are wise to this. It is kind of cliché, I can't even remember the last time I saw it on food, it must have been post 90s but I'm drawing a blank. Maybe I'm not very observant when it comes to this, I focus more on ingredients. As it is the packaged food I eat is limited and specialised. Own-brands of supermarkets wouldn't bother with this.

    More likely they will silent change something, they might rename the food item.
    Sicilian style sausage becomes Italian style sausage, etc. They tend to use simualr style packaging so you make the transition. Though also they randomly change the packaging for no obvious reason. A lot of it has to do with positioning in supermarkets.
  • verityverity Administrator, Citizen
    What is concern for me is free from brand changing their ingredient or not being available any more.
  • HylianHylian Citizen, Mentor
    verity said:
    I haven't seen that for a while. It must have gone out fashion in marketing where I am, or the food I eat doesn't have this on their packaging. I think it is more common on non-food items. "new and improved formula".

    Generally such a phrase in food means they have cut costs, and UK/Irish consumers are wise to this. It is kind of cliché, I can't even remember the last time I saw it on food, it must have been post 90s but I'm drawing a blank. Maybe I'm not very observant when it comes to this, I focus more on ingredients. As it is the packaged food I eat is limited and specialised. Own-brands of supermarkets wouldn't bother with this.

    More likely they will silent change something, they might rename the food item.
    Sicilian style sausage becomes Italian style sausage, etc. They tend to use simualr style packaging so you make the transition. Though also they randomly change the packaging for no obvious reason. A lot of it has to do with positioning in supermarkets.
    Sometimes brands try to "improve" their foods here, and like you said it's just actually a cost cutting measure. Things like this were very frustrating for my parents because my brother would only eat very specific things, and I'd occasionally get fixated on specific foods, so if brands changed them we wouldn't be able to eat that thing anymore.
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