What does dealing with "bad" sounds feel like to you?

HylianHylian Citizen, Mentor
I'm wondering what other people experience when they have to deal with sounds that they don't like.

My issue with them is that some sounds seem amplified for me, and when I have to hear them I can physically feel the sound vibrating through my ears/head, even if other people say they don't experience that. If the sound isn't of short duration it starts to hurt my ears and head, so I want to cover my ears or leave the area, which people sometimes make fun of me for because they say I'm being "dramatic". Due to that I try to not cover my ears or leave even though it physically pains me.

Comments

  • BenderBender Citizen
    Yesterday, there was a kid shrieking in the store. It felt like an electric drill going in my head through my ear.

    I experience that kind of "vibration" too with some sounds. I have no idea why, but my ears have always been sensitive and I was prone to infections or inflammation as a child. 
  • HylianHylian Citizen, Mentor
    Bender said:
    Yesterday, there was a kid shrieking in the store. It felt like an electric drill going in my head through my ear.

    I experience that kind of "vibration" too with some sounds. I have no idea why, but my ears have always been sensitive and I was prone to infections or inflammation as a child. 
    I think an electric drill is the perfect way to describe the feeling! When I was a kid the feeling used to make me freak out and have a meltdown, but I've learned to stay composed as I've gotten older.

    I've also been prone to ear infections. The ear I am prone to them in also is more sensitive to the drilling feeling, so maybe ear infections have made it worse. Though ironically other sounds I feel less and they don't bother me as much, because my actual ability to hear isn't as great as it was. lol
  • BenderBender Citizen
    What I'm thinking is that the sensorial sensitivity (autism) makes the sound louder and more intense, and my sensitive ears take things to the next level lol

    It sucks, believe me, I know. I wear earphones almost everywhere.
  • For me it's repetitive,stop start,noises, like a hammer or drill being used.
  • HylianHylian Citizen, Mentor
    The thing that made me think about this topic was I was doing the dishes and the clanking of putting them away made my ears hurt. Even slight clanking sounded amplified to me, and I could feel the vibration of the sound in my ears/head. It's really odd and impossible to ignore.
  • AmityAmity Administrator, Citizen
    Hylian said:
    I'm wondering what other people experience when they have to deal with sounds that they don't like.

    My issue with them is that some sounds seem amplified for me, and when I have to hear them I can physically feel the sound vibrating through my ears/head, even if other people say they don't experience that. If the sound isn't of short duration it starts to hurt my ears and head, so I want to cover my ears or leave the area, which people sometimes make fun of me for because they say I'm being "dramatic". Due to that I try to not cover my ears or leave even though it physically pains me.

    Aye I've had people use my noise sensitivity to make fun of me, my emotional state is the amplifier.

    I feel the vibration ye mentioned especially with raised voices or shouting, it becomes a level of pain that I find untolerable.

    A sudden loud noise when my sense of hearing is overstimulated has led to an almost electric shock type reaction in my body.
    Since childhood I've called it white pain, I literally see a flash of what I percieve as the colour white to accompany the sudden and debilitating pain I feel in this situation. It passes as quickly as it happens.

    Barking dogs in back gardens, childrens high pitched continuous shrieking, these examples lead to a state of distress for me, its a bit like the chicken and the egg.

    Construction noises, mechanical noises like hedge trimmers with a variable noise level are also without a pattern and relatively unpredictable. They have a similar effect on my emotional state.

    If a noise is patterened or predictable I find ways to cope, leaving the space or I use my bose noise cancelling headphones, if the noise is still coming through and im not working I'll play some relaxing music or meditations to block out the noise.

    Sometimes though I just need silence, as the only way to recover.
  • HylianHylian Citizen, Mentor
    Amity said:
    Hylian said:
    I'm wondering what other people experience when they have to deal with sounds that they don't like.

    My issue with them is that some sounds seem amplified for me, and when I have to hear them I can physically feel the sound vibrating through my ears/head, even if other people say they don't experience that. If the sound isn't of short duration it starts to hurt my ears and head, so I want to cover my ears or leave the area, which people sometimes make fun of me for because they say I'm being "dramatic". Due to that I try to not cover my ears or leave even though it physically pains me.

    Aye I've had people use my noise sensitivity to make fun of me, my emotional state is the amplifier.

    I feel the vibration ye mentioned especially with raised voices or shouting, it becomes a level of pain that I find untolerable.

    A sudden loud noise when my sense of hearing is overstimulated has led to an almost electric shock type reaction in my body.
    Since childhood I've called it white pain, I literally see a flash of what I percieve as the colour white to accompany the sudden and debilitating pain I feel in this situation. It passes as quickly as it happens.

    Barking dogs in back gardens, childrens high pitched continuous shrieking, these examples lead to a state of distress for me, its a bit like the chicken and the egg.

    Construction noises, mechanical noises like hedge trimmers with a variable noise level are also without a pattern and relatively unpredictable. They have a similar effect on my emotional state.

    If a noise is patterened or predictable I find ways to cope, leaving the space or I use my bose noise cancelling headphones, if the noise is still coming through and im not working I'll play some relaxing music or meditations to block out the noise.

    Sometimes though I just need silence, as the only way to recover.
    I've found that patterned noises aren't usually as bad, but they're still not great. I'm also glad our dog rarely barks because I can't handle big dogs barking.

    And even though I've learned to mostly compose myself, if I have to deal with noises like this for an extended period of time (like someone's doing yard work, or whatever) I feeI my fight-or-flight response kick in, so I get angry and/or feel like having a meltdown. At times like that I really need to completely get away from the source of sound.
  • BenderBender Citizen
    Hylian said:
    The thing that made me think about this topic was I was doing the dishes and the clanking of putting them away made my ears hurt. Even slight clanking sounded amplified to me, and I could feel the vibration of the sound in my ears/head. It's really odd and impossible to ignore.
    For me, it's the squeaking sound some people make when washing dishes, particularly glass *shudders*.
  • HylianHylian Citizen, Mentor
    I just got to experience the wonderful sensation of someone scraping at my eardrums, since my neighbour was drilling outside. Lovely. 🙃

    Bender said:
    Hylian said:
    The thing that made me think about this topic was I was doing the dishes and the clanking of putting them away made my ears hurt. Even slight clanking sounded amplified to me, and I could feel the vibration of the sound in my ears/head. It's really odd and impossible to ignore.
    For me, it's the squeaking sound some people make when washing dishes, particularly glass *shudders*.
    That squeaking sound is so annoying, it's one of the sounds that makes my soul want to cringe.
  • AmityAmity Administrator, Citizen
    Hylian said:
    Amity said:
    Hylian said:
    I'm wondering what other people experience when they have to deal with sounds that they don't like.

    My issue with them is that some sounds seem amplified for me, and when I have to hear them I can physically feel the sound vibrating through my ears/head, even if other people say they don't experience that. If the sound isn't of short duration it starts to hurt my ears and head, so I want to cover my ears or leave the area, which people sometimes make fun of me for because they say I'm being "dramatic". Due to that I try to not cover my ears or leave even though it physically pains me.

    Aye I've had people use my noise sensitivity to make fun of me, my emotional state is the amplifier.

    I feel the vibration ye mentioned especially with raised voices or shouting, it becomes a level of pain that I find untolerable.

    A sudden loud noise when my sense of hearing is overstimulated has led to an almost electric shock type reaction in my body.
    Since childhood I've called it white pain, I literally see a flash of what I percieve as the colour white to accompany the sudden and debilitating pain I feel in this situation. It passes as quickly as it happens.

    Barking dogs in back gardens, childrens high pitched continuous shrieking, these examples lead to a state of distress for me, its a bit like the chicken and the egg.

    Construction noises, mechanical noises like hedge trimmers with a variable noise level are also without a pattern and relatively unpredictable. They have a similar effect on my emotional state.

    If a noise is patterened or predictable I find ways to cope, leaving the space or I use my bose noise cancelling headphones, if the noise is still coming through and im not working I'll play some relaxing music or meditations to block out the noise.

    Sometimes though I just need silence, as the only way to recover.
    I've found that patterned noises aren't usually as bad, but they're still not great. I'm also glad our dog rarely barks because I can't handle big dogs barking.

    And even though I've learned to mostly compose myself, if I have to deal with noises like this for an extended period of time (like someone's doing yard work, or whatever) I feeI my fight-or-flight response kick in, so I get angry and/or feel like having a meltdown. At times like that I really need to completely get away from the source of sound.

    For years I didnt know why I felt anger about noises, Im not even sure I knew I was annoyed or why. lol. Fun times.

    I think the worst mechanical noise for me is the variation levels with someone using a chainsaw, the high pitched whine and the dull grumbling idle noises without any pattern really wear me down.

    You feel noises vibrate in your head, causing pain so do I.
    Before that point I feel a disconnect from my body, almost like a calm before a storm or moments before it starts to rain.

    I feel it in my body too, the tightness in my chest and shoulders, part of me wonders if the anticipation of being overwhelmed actually causes it to happen faster.
  • I feel angry, irritated and in pain. As if I'm stuck in a box that someone else is shaking from the outside and I want out of the box but can't get out. Sometimes I just want to cover my ears and yell at people.

    Personally, I tend to hum or start singing or I'll start talking to myself (either in my head or out loud) such as listing tasks I have to do later. I might walk off or just keep telling myself that it's only temporary and that the discomfort will stop soon.

    I used to carry an mp3 around with me and listen to the same songs to block such things out. Singing gently to myself doesn't bring much attention, people are used to me being a big fan of music (especially musicals) so randomly breaking into song isn't out of character. Particularly if it's a popular catchy song, then people tend to just assume I have a persistent earworm. Music helps me cope. That's why I often sing when putting away dishes, it distracts me from the harsh sounds. 






  • HylianHylian Citizen, Mentor
    I feel angry, irritated and in pain. As if I'm stuck in a box that someone else is shaking from the outside and I want out of the box but can't get out. Sometimes I just want to cover my ears and yell at people.

    Personally, I tend to hum or start singing or I'll start talking to myself (either in my head or out loud) such as listing tasks I have to do later. I might walk off or just keep telling myself that it's only temporary and that the discomfort will stop soon.

    I used to carry an mp3 around with me and listen to the same songs to block such things out. Singing gently to myself doesn't bring much attention, people are used to me being a big fan of music (especially musicals) so randomly breaking into song isn't out of character. Particularly if it's a popular catchy song, then people tend to just assume I have a persistent earworm. Music helps me cope. That's why I often sing when putting away dishes, it distracts me from the harsh sounds. 






    Using music to cope sounds like a good idea. I have considered wearing ear buds around and listening to music in public to deal with noise before, though I find that not being able to hear my surroundings puts me on high alert anyways. It seems like sensory issues are sometimes a lose/lose situation, whether you decide to do something to cope with them or just grin and bear it. :/
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