Gluten-free

BenderBender Citizen
edited January 2021 in Mind and Body Wellbeing

I know a lot of people on the spectrum seem to have various digestive issues and often an allergy or sensitivity to gluten. I'm not allergic, but I'm slightly intolerant I think and I've definitely noticed I have more energy and less inflammatory issues when I cut it out.

I actually discovered this accidentally, while trying low carb (keto). I still eat low carb for small stretches of time once in a while merely for the increased energy I get from it.

Anybody else here who tried it or has experience with it? Do you have any other food allergies or sensitivities that affect your functioning level?

Comments

  • verityverity Administrator, Citizen

    I am gluten free. It has helped a lot becuase digestion has an effect on the the nervous system. I became GF over 12 years ago and haven't looked back. I haven't missed it or found it difficult, only accidentally had gluten. I don't tend to focus on the GF section of supermarkets as that tend to focus on substitutes, there are some staples that I do get for convenience.Some people really panic when catering for GF, and over react.

    I used to wake up with a sea of bile in my tummy, loose as well as IBS, very hyper-vigilant and hypersensitive and that was my day. It had an effect on my cogitation and anxiety for sure.

    I'm not preachy about GF, becuase I have no idea what effect it might have on others.

    I am also dairy free as well, though Amity notices the effect of occasional consumption in my behaviour/cognition more than me. Though I have been pretty consistently dairy for 12 years, with a few exception such as using ghee which has low in caesin.

    I used to avoid a lot more becuase it used to be grown and processed with other grain continuing gluten, now it easy to get oat that are 'gluten free'.

    I also was told about oat gluten, but it is so trace I found no ill effects form it. I'm sure some people who are allergic may react to it, but that level of contamination could be found anywhere it is so negligible. Oat milk has largely replaced almond/coconut milk, and I have got into porridge in the last couple of years.

  • HylianHylian Citizen, Mentor

    I've also noticed that when I went on a low-carb diet that I felt a lot better physically. I don't know if I have a gluten specific issue, but the less carb-laden things I eat the better, so I certainly wouldn't miss eating anything with gluten in it. I've started eating low-carb again recently to lose weight and I don't feel as ill at the moment.

    I have a dairy allergy, too, that took 14 years to get recognized. It is more mild than anaphylaxis but enough to make me sick and give me ulcers. Guess what I used to drink all the time as a kid because no one could get me to eat. lol

    That's the extent of my food issues, at least what I've recognized so far.

  • @Hylian said:
    I've also noticed that when I went on a low-carb diet that I felt a lot better physically. I don't know if I have a gluten specific issue, but the less carb-laden things I eat the better, so I certainly wouldn't miss eating anything with gluten in it. I've started eating low-carb again recently to lose weight and I don't feel as ill at the moment.

    When you achieve your goals and raise your catb intake, it might be worth to do it without gluten products for a while to see if there's any difference. I discovered that my inflammatory issues basically disappeared, including some rheumatic pain. But low carb makes me much more alert. which is why I do it once in a while, for the extra boost.

  • @verity said:
    I am gluten free. It has helped a lot becuase digestion has an effect on the the nervous system. I became GF over 12 years ago and haven't looked back. I haven't missed it or found it difficult, only accidentally had gluten. I don't tend to focus on the GF section of supermarkets as that tend to focus on substitutes, there are some staples that I do get for convenience.Some people really panic when catering for GF, and over react.

    I didn't find it particularly hard either, especially since I dislike fast-food, and after a couple of months, I just didn't miss anything much. Oats, almond flour and buckwheat are great for baking too.

    I used to wake up with a sea of bile in my tummy, loose as well as IBS, very hyper-vigilant and hypersensitive and that was my day. It had an effect on my cogitation and anxiety for sure.

    I admit I had none of these issues, except hyper-vigilance and anxiety that didn't respond to a gluten-free diet as they probably had a different origin.

    I'm not preachy about GF, becuase I have no idea what effect it might have on others.

    One size fits all rarely fits anyone 😉

    I am also dairy free as well, though Amity notices the effect of occasional consumption in my behaviour/cognition more than me. Though I have been pretty consistently dairy for 12 years, with a few exception such as using ghee which has low in caesin.

    I used to avoid a lot more becuase it used to be grown and processed with other grain continuing gluten, now it easy to get oat that are 'gluten free'.

    I also was told about oat gluten, but it is so trace I found no ill effects form it. I'm sure some people who are allergic may react to it, but that level of contamination could be found anywhere it is so negligible. Oat milk has largely replaced almond/coconut milk, and I have got into porridge in the last couple of years.

    I like almond milk - the roasted, unsweetened kind. I can't imagine giving up good cheese or greek yoghurt, basically the only dairy I have (with some very occasional cream or sour cream), but it doesn't seem to cause me any issues.

  • verityverity Administrator, Citizen

    I don't mind almond milk, but usually have a mixture of coconut and almond.

    Though I think almond milks one of the least environmentally sound vegetable milks, due to the amount of water needed.I think oat milk is healthier too, but I still use coconut and almond on occation.

    I also use some soya "dairy" products.

    Amity used to like the hazelnut one, but she drink the oat one now.

    What amazed me was the oat crème fresh. Was not expecting it to work.

  • Never tried oat milk, I'll add it to my shopping list and see who that goes, I can't tolerate the soy one.

    Coconut milk is a staple in my house, it's a miracle ingredient for cooking.

  • verityverity Administrator, Citizen

    Coconut milk and cream a staple of many cuisines.

    What you will be impressed by is Oat milk's cooking applications, it is good all-rounder for sauces, and thickens evenly and is not overpowering.

  • AmityAmity Administrator, Citizen

    Living with Verity has introduced a dairy and gluten free diet into my life.
    Yes I can confirm that he shouldnt eat dairy, ever 😉.

    Gluten makes me drowsy and gives me brain fog, I'm intolerant, I get irritable to boot.

    I have real bread as a treat from time to time, oh I love a ham and cheese sanbo with a cup of tea... simple pleasures eh.

    Regular dairy foods are a trigger for the gastritis I experience, I eat cheese as a treat still though, but its oat milk all the way for me now.

    It's the best of the dairy alternatives imo and agreed with Verity, it's a very neutral flavor for cooking with with the creamy properties of cows milk.

    I can eat a soft poached egg from time to time, the yoke is always fine, but it's the white that my body reacts quite badly too.

    A hint of overcooking in the poached egg and I am in agony for 2 days or so.
    I love pancakes/crepes but they bring on the worst reaction of all.

  • @Amity said:
    Living with Verity has introduced a dairy and gluten free diet into my life.
    Yes I can confirm that he shouldnt eat dairy, ever 😉.

    Gluten makes me drowsy and gives me brain fog, I'm intolerant, I get irritable to boot.

    I get a bit like this too, plus inflammatory issues.

    Regular dairy foods are a trigger for the gastritis I experience, I eat cheese as a treat still though, but its oat milk all the way for me now.

    Interesting, I have chronic gastritis that flares up due to stress. Greek yoghurt (no flavour or sugar added) or sour milk help a lot with pain, but never on an empty stomach. Other fermented products seem to help too and drinking bone broth regularly made a big difference for me.

    It's the best of the dairy alternatives imo and agreed with Verity, it's a very neutral flavor for cooking with with the creamy properties of cows milk.

    Can't wait to try!

    I can eat a soft poached egg from time to time, the yoke is always fine, but it's the white that my body reacts quite badly too.

    A hint of overcooking in the poached egg and I am in agony for 2 days or so.
    I love pancakes/crepes but they bring on the worst reaction of all.

    Wow, that sounds very drastic, I love eggs. My son never eats the whites in any form, it's a taste and texture thing for him and I just give him the yolks and use the whites for something else.

  • AmityAmity Administrator, Citizen
    edited January 2021

    @Bender said:

    @Amity said:
    Living with Verity has introduced a dairy and gluten free diet into my life.
    Yes I can confirm that he shouldnt eat dairy, ever 😉.

    Gluten makes me drowsy and gives me brain fog, I'm intolerant, I get irritable to boot.

    I get a bit like this too, plus inflammatory issues.

    Regular dairy foods are a trigger for the gastritis I experience, I eat cheese as a treat still though, but its oat milk all the way for me now.

    Interesting, I have chronic gastritis that flares up due to stress. Greek yoghurt (no flavour or sugar added) or sour milk help a lot with pain, but never on an empty stomach. Other fermented products seem to help too and drinking bone broth regularly made a big difference for me.

    It's the best of the dairy alternatives imo and agreed with Verity, it's a very neutral flavor for cooking with with the creamy properties of cows milk.

    Can't wait to try!

    I can eat a soft poached egg from time to time, the yoke is always fine, but it's the white that my body reacts quite badly too.

    A hint of overcooking in the poached egg and I am in agony for 2 days or so.
    I love pancakes/crepes but they bring on the worst reaction of all.

    Wow, that sounds very drastic, I love eggs. My son never eats the whites in any form, it's a taste and texture thing for him and I just give him the yolks and use the whites for something else.

    I had an endoscopy prior to the gastritis diagnosis, it was stress related also (...what else would it be at this stage) and managing it by diet wasn't an option anymore. Dairy helps sooth the immediate pain, but causes it to become worse a few hours later as it results in a build up of acid. I was lactose intolerant as a baby, had a lot of reflux.

  • BenderBender Citizen
    edited January 2021

    Sorry to hear that, I've been on and off on medication for it, these days I try to prevent flare-ups through lifestyle - when possible.

    The pain can be truly awful too.

  • verityverity Administrator, Citizen

    To me the anti-GERD diet is way more extreme than GF or DF.

    I think it is sometimes necessary but I can't see it workign long term. After all that is only one aspect of digestion.

  • verityverity Administrator, Citizen

    GF is really not a special diet at all.

  • I tried gluten free for several weeks and it did nothing for me. I had been very hopeful since so many people have found it to reduce symptoms of inflammation.

    I became lactose intolerant at some point in my 40s, but am not affected by cheese or yogurt. I rarely use any kind of milk for anything. I will use coconut milk in recipes.

    Bender, how do you make bone broth? Or perhaps I should put this in the cooking section. But you mentioned it here.

  • Bone broth? I don't know that there's only one way to make it, but the way I make it is thus:

    Accumulate enough bones of whichever animal you're using. I generally have more chicken bones then other animals. I don't eat beef unless it's 100% organic 100% grass fed, so I rarely eat beef. I do have over 200 pounds of organic pasture raised/grass fed pork in the freezer right now, but that's normally a rarity. In my area I have a health food type store, a food cooperative that sells frozen organic chicken including frozen packages of chicken backs and chicken feet. Chicken backs and chicken feet make the best bone broth out of any other part of the chicken. Thankfully they're still fairly inexpensive at or around $2 per pound. Beef and pork bones now command a premium price because bone broth is such a craze now. I digress...

    Generally I don't brown or roast the bones for making a sipping broth, but I definitely do for making broth as a base for soup.

    The best tool I use for making broth of any kind is the pressure cooker. It extracts the most from the bones in the least amount of time. Pressure cook the bones and water for 40 mins or so, remove from the burner and let the pressure drop on its own. Strain and separate or skim the fat. Add sea salt to taste if desired. Done.

    I'm trying a new experiment because I raised and processed 25 chickens last month. I pressure canned gallons of chicken broth which is shelf stable for at least a year. I separated the meat from the bones and then pressure cooked just the bones until they were so soft that I was able to blend them into a texture similar to pâté. I then dehydrated the mush and blended that into a coarse dry powder (consistency of cornmeal). What am I going to use that for? Bone meal fertilizer for the garden this year.

    I don't personally make bone broth just to consume bone broth. I always use the broth as a basis for soups. The other reason I don't consume just the bone broth for its benefits is that I'm an odd sort in that I've always considered eating very well cooked cartilage and connective tissue a treat. Roasting a bunch of pork bones and then pressure cooking them is a delicacy to me. My wife says she can't watch me pick at the bones and frankly gnaw on them because it's too animalistic. I'm amused that she buys a collagen powder to add to her smoothies for health when I'm getting the same benefits if not better from eating that stuff the way I do. So I get the health benefits of collagen, marrow, etc from the source rather than in broth just for broth's sake.

    You know the beak shaped piece of cartilage on the end of a chicken breast colloquially known as "the Pope's nose"? What a great treat.

  • BenderBender Citizen
    edited January 2021

    @blazingstar said:
    I tried gluten free for several weeks and it did nothing for me. I had been very hopeful since so many people have found it to reduce symptoms of inflammation.

    Keep in mind that people who have Celiac or an actual allergy will see results pretty fast, but it takes about 3 months to eliminate gluten from your body and it can take at least this long to restore intestinal balance for instance. There's still no guarantee that it would be useful for you, in particular, everybody's different.

    I became lactose intolerant at some point in my 40s, but am not affected by cheese or yogurt. I rarely use any kind of milk for anything. I will use coconut milk in recipes.

    We're both very lucky this way. Fermented/cultured dairy products work very well for me.

    Bender, how do you make bone broth? Or perhaps I should put this in the cooking section. But you mentioned it here.

    No worries, it's relevant and tangents are allowed in this discussion.

    Magna's instructions are perfect. I roast the bones if they're raw, but don't do it if I save them from roasted chicken or other cooked dishes. If you can find chicken feet anywhere they make a brilliant addition along with any type of cartilage. A pressure cooker helps a lot, as in the past people simmered it for 48 to 72 hours.

    I usually cook mine for about 3 hours for smaller bones or 5 for larger ones in the pressure cooker and simmer down some batches to make fond or use for demi-glace. This is a good guide to help you understand the differences between flavour, consistency etc: https://www.pressurecookrecipes.com/instant-pot-bone-broth/

    If you like shellfish, making broth out of shells is also delicious and nutritious, perfect for making bisques. And it cooks faster.

    @Magna said:

    I don't personally make bone broth just to consume bone broth. I always use the broth as a basis for soups. The other reason I don't consume just the bone broth for its benefits is that I'm an odd sort in that I've always considered eating very well cooked cartilage and connective tissue a treat. Roasting a bunch of pork bones and then pressure cooking them is a delicacy to me. My wife says she can't watch me pick at the bones and frankly gnaw on them because it's too animalistic. I'm amused that she buys a collagen powder to add to her smoothies for health when I'm getting the same benefits if not better from eating that stuff the way I do. So I get the health benefits of collagen, marrow, etc from the source rather than in broth just for broth's sake.

    You know the beak shaped piece of cartilage on the end of a chicken breast colloquially known as "the Pope's nose"? What a great treat.

    You're very lucky. I eat raw meat so the "animalistic" side doesn't bother me, but I absolutely hate the consistency of cartilage (sucking out the bone marrow is great though). Traditionally, most European countries (and I hear it's similar in Asia) have specialities using ears, noses, knuckles, animal heads or feet - terrine, aspic or what the Germans call "pork head cheese" are probably the best known, but there are many others. Eating organs is also still common and some of the dishes are seen as a delicacy. It was inconceivable not to make the best out of every part of an animal sacrificed for food, it's only in recent times of overabundance that various bits people consider "gross" are discarded or used for pet food. It's a pain in the behind as they became harder to find and you usually have to place a special order with your butcher.

    What you're doing is great for your body, my wife's nails became incredibly strong merely from the collagen in broth and I saw a definite improvement with bone pain.

  • ^ Thanks, Bender. Do you make aspic if you don't like cartilage? Or something similar, "brawn" or in Sweden "sylta". Basically broth so concentrated with collagen that it sets like gelatin with tasty meat bits and spices. Such a treat. I'm of German descent and my Dad grew up eating something like sylta that his family called "scrud" which I don't think is an actual term outside of the family but it's basically head cheese with white vinegar added.

    Pressure cooking the bones for 3 hours? Wow, I've never cooked them that long. I should try that and see how it goes. I will say that when I've made broth for soup bases if I cook the broth to death I find it's almost like it crosses a point to where it tastes overdone to me. You and I differ on cartilage. Ever since I was a kid for example, I relished consuming the well done ends of chicken bones; not only the cartilage, but I'd eat the soft ends of the bones as well.

  • OliOli Citizen

    I've been gluten free since 2009 but have lapsed at times. I eat food that naturally contains no gluten rather than manufactured gluten free foods, which have ingredients such as cellulose as fillers and I can't bring myself to eat something which isn't far removed from cardboard.
    I also limit dairy consumption down to a little cheese every now and then. As well as the other non-dairy drinks mentioned, hemp seed 'milk' is very good. If you have a bullet blender it's very easy to make your own.
    I follow a keto like diet with mainly nuts and seeds, eggs, fish, vegetables and berries.
    I make my own collagen supplement with boiled down chicken feet, yum!

    I don't know if this diet helps autism symptoms any, but it certainly has helped my general health and kept me going despite several quite serious health hitches.

  • ^ I've made my own soy milk, oat milk and almond milk before. I've never made hemp seed milk, but now I want to try it! Thanks for the suggestion, Oli.

  • @Oli said:
    I've been gluten free since 2009 but have lapsed at times. I eat food that naturally contains no gluten rather than manufactured gluten free foods, which have ingredients such as cellulose as fillers and I can't bring myself to eat something which isn't far removed from cardboard.
    I also limit dairy consumption down to a little cheese every now and then. As well as the other non-dairy drinks mentioned, hemp seed 'milk' is very good. If you have a bullet blender it's very easy to make your own.
    I follow a keto like diet with mainly nuts and seeds, eggs, fish, vegetables and berries.

    This is interesting, do you stay in keto all the time or do you re-feed once in a while? This became a bit of a trend for losing weight, but I'm fascinated with it for the way I feel when I'm on it - no bloating, no inflammatory issues, no brain fog and much more energy. I have to eat nuts or make "fat bombs" to ensure I don't lose weight though.

    Are you getting similar benefits out of it?

    I make my own collagen supplement with boiled down chicken feet, yum!

    This is great, not only collagen supplements can be expensive, but you must do research to find reliable ones. I've been taught to use chicken feet by an Asian friend when I started making Thai soups and curries. She told me that if I'm not going to use chicken feet for the broth, I shouldn't even bother, because it will never taste "right" 😁

    I don't know if this diet helps autism symptoms any, but it certainly has helped my general health and kept me going despite several quite serious health hitches.

    Same here and obviously, when I feel stronger and healthier it becomes a bit easier to deal with other issues like anxiety or even sensory overload outside.

  • BenderBender Citizen
    edited January 2021

    @Magna said:
    ^ Thanks, Bender. Do you make aspic if you don't like cartilage? Or something similar, "brawn" or in Sweden "sylta". Basically broth so concentrated with collagen that it sets like gelatin with tasty meat bits and spices. Such a treat. I'm of German descent and my Dad grew up eating something like sylta that his family called "scrud" which I don't think is an actual term outside of the family but it's basically head cheese with white vinegar added.

    I don't eat aspic, foods that "move" freak me out. I never make Crème Brûlée for the same reason, I can't even look at it lol.

    I use them processed in terrine or pâté.

    Pressure cooking the bones for 3 hours? Wow, I've never cooked them that long. I should try that and see how it goes. I will say that when I've made broth for soup bases if I cook the broth to death I find it's almost like it crosses a point to where it tastes overdone to me. You and I differ on cartilage. Ever since I was a kid for example, I relished consuming the well done ends of chicken bones; not only the cartilage, but I'd eat the soft ends of the bones as well.

    It really depends on your preference, it's why I posted the colour/consistency chart for blaze and it also depends what you use it for. Back in the day, I was taught that simmering for longer helps extract all the nutrients and flavours, but YMMV.

  • OliOli Citizen

    @Bender
    The aim is to stay in ketosis. I should stress here that my diet is strictly medical in nature, not a weight loss measure or to feel less autistic.
    Having said that, I do allow myself some carb heavier days if things are going well.

    I've been playing around with intermittent fasting and OMAD, exercising in a fasted state and eating at certain times e.g. before evening. The jury is still out on whether any of them make a difference.

  • I got distracted by the end of the month deadlines.

    It appears I have misunderstood the bone broth. I was using not only a chicken carcass or two, but also carrots, onions, celery to make it more flavorful. I also have not used a pressure cooker. I am afraid of pressure cookers. I am quite sure they are going to explode.

    So, if I am understanding it correctly, I am to use carcass only, no veggies and cook in pressure cooker for an hour?

    Do you boil it down to thicken it?

    Re: gluten free and other diets. I have found in my long 25 year now journey in combatting my autoimmune disorder that some things are not perceived as "working" until other things are under control. I have had more success with some supplements at this point in time, whereas early in the journey, supplements had no noticeable effect. Just one example.

    I don't eat much gluten anyway. I don't eat cereal and hardly any bread or noodles. I've just moved over to more fresh fruit and veggies and lean proteins rather than noodles and bread. I do still quite love sweets. I am expecting at any moment to learn I am diabetic and cannot have carbs at all. I think I might be the person who can't stop eating sweets even when my life and limbs are at risk. Due to my work, I have seen people with toes, feet and entire entire lower limbs removed bilaterally. I still can't imagine not eating sweets.

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