What is "aspie/aspies" supposed to mean now?

HylianHylian Citizen, Mentor
I know "aspie" usually stands for people with Asperger's, but I see people use it even when they're participating in a topic about autistic people in general. I don't know if they are talking about people specifically with Asperger's or general autism anymore. Maybe I am taking the use of "aspie" too literally.

Is "aspie" just another general term for "autistic" now, or is it still just for referring to people with Asperger's?

Comments

  • As far as I can tell, it has become an informal synonym for ASD Level 1, now that "Asperger's syndrome" is no longer an official diagnostic term, at least here in the U.S.A.
  • BenderBender Citizen
    As far as I can tell, it has become an informal synonym for ASD Level 1, now that "Asperger's syndrome" is no longer an official diagnostic term, at least here in the U.S.A.
    Yes, at least online, it seems to be used for "high functioning" autism.
  • Statest16Statest16 Citizen, Mentor
    Such as the history in general of language,the formal becomes slang for something else which then becomes formal again and then again is reslanged.

    No big surprises that "Aspie" has taken new life,language is ever evolving thing.

    If you go to an airport and go to Southwest Airlines office,shortly incoming flights are listed as "fixin' to land"

    In Boston there already using Boston idioms on local street signs.
  • HylianHylian Citizen, Mentor
    It being a general term for "high functioning" now makes sense. I think I got confused because I took it literally (as in it meaning Asperger's), but people were using it while talking generally about autistic people. Thank you for your replies!
  • AmityAmity Administrator, Citizen
    Ive thought of it like a pet name, a diminutive and also linked to identity and a sense of interconnectness with similar people.
    An aid to a more accurate perception of self, which I feel for later diagnosed folk tends to be redesigned after a confusing history begins to make sense.
    When people still use it, I see that as the continuation of a regular habit and generally assume they would identify as ASD level 1 now.

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