Dyscalculia

HylianHylian Citizen, Mentor
I am wondering if anyone else here has dyscalculia? How does it present for you, and what has helped you deal with it? Do you also have a career or want to go into one that uses a lot of math?

I recently was reading some things about it, and when something referred to it as "math learning disorder" it made me remember that I had that as a diagnosis as a kid. My dad made my doctor remove it from my current diagnoses though when I was around 11, because he didn't like me being diagnosed with it, so I forgot about it until now. 

I think if I had that in my records still and I actively knew about it as an adult + adolescent that it would have been very helpful, especially since I have always done terrible with math beyond basic multiplication (I never even learned how to divide properly, I just use a calculator).

Realizing I have dyscalculia is nice though, since now I know why I can't remember concepts in math for longer than a month or two, can't do mental math, etc. It's also helpful because I've felt bad about not being able to pass my states math exam multiple times, and now I get that I'm not just dumb or not putting enough effort into it.

It's also a bit upsetting because a lot of the careers I want to get into are STEM related and they require a lot of math. I don't know if I'd ever be able to go into any of those careers since I can't remember things beyond basic multiplication for more than a couple months.

Comments

  • I have it but have never gotten treatment for it because my parents think it isn’t real and that I either just needed to get interested in math or have it jammed into my head. They made me undergo the latter in college when I failed the math part of the accuplacer so I had to do mandatory remedial math courses. They jammed the math into my head to the point I got burning headaches and cried from frustration when I failed at a good grade on an assignment since I had to make a certain amount of points or I would have to take the course all over again even if I got a passing grade. 

    I can’t do anything beyond simple math mentally and have to use my fingers a lot. I require a calculator for more advanced math and not being allowed to use one on the college exams was a nightmare for me. I also couldn’t get a tutor since they were only available when I had to be at my damn job and they couldn’t be flexible with their hours. I no longer have to do remedial math but I require one more math course to have even an Associate’s Degree and I dread it to the point I don’t even consider taking it just to get it over with because I don’t want my life being ripped away from me anymore. 

    I never could use a combination lock because the numbers wouldn’t stick in my mind nor could I get the precision to dial the numbers correctly and I still can’t use one unless someone helps me. It took me years to understand and tell the time on analog clocks. I can’t balance a check book and don’t even use checks at all for that reason. I also don’t know what the tax on an item or more will be and will often be surprised at the totals I get. 

    Numbers will get switched around in my mind and for a long time, I would write down my social security number wrong because I had a false memory of two of the numbers. I can’t play poker because the numerical aspect to it doesn’t make sense to me and it translates to chess as well. I also can’t do advanced computer programming and probably not even basic programming. 

    What really frustrates me more than anything about it is that it makes me unable to read sheet music, understand musical time signatures, and choreograph dance moves. I haven’t written any of my own songs and I forget even basic dance moves partly because of the damn condition. 

    Having the condition has also undone future college plans and potential careers for me. I once thought I was going to be an animal vet but after learning that math was required for it and I struggled with even standard algebra, I ruled out being one. Apparently even non-STEM fields require advanced math and it makes me feel like there are no potential careers I can go into. 
  • HylianHylian Citizen, Mentor
    Markness said:
    I have it but have never gotten treatment for it because my parents think it isn’t real and that I either just needed to get interested in math or have it jammed into my head. They made me undergo the latter in college when I failed the math part of the accuplacer so I had to do mandatory remedial math courses. They jammed the math into my head to the point I got burning headaches and cried from frustration when I failed at a good grade on an assignment since I had to make a certain amount of points or I would have to take the course all over again even if I got a passing grade. 

    I can’t do anything beyond simple math mentally and have to use my fingers a lot. I require a calculator for more advanced math and not being allowed to use one on the college exams was a nightmare for me. I also couldn’t get a tutor since they were only available when I had to be at my damn job and they couldn’t be flexible with their hours. I no longer have to do remedial math but I require one more math course to have even an Associate’s Degree and I dread it to the point I don’t even consider taking it just to get it over with because I don’t want my life being ripped away from me anymore. 

    I never could use a combination lock because the numbers wouldn’t stick in my mind nor could I get the precision to dial the numbers correctly and I still can’t use one unless someone helps me. It took me years to understand and tell the time on analog clocks. I can’t balance a check book and don’t even use checks at all for that reason. I also don’t know what the tax on an item or more will be and will often be surprised at the totals I get. 

    Numbers will get switched around in my mind and for a long time, I would write down my social security number wrong because I had a false memory of two of the numbers. I can’t play poker because the numerical aspect to it doesn’t make sense to me and it translates to chess as well. I also can’t do advanced computer programming and probably not even basic programming. 

    What really frustrates me more than anything about it is that it makes me unable to read sheet music, understand musical time signatures, and choreograph dance moves. I haven’t written any of my own songs and I forget even basic dance moves partly because of the damn condition. 

    Having the condition has also undone future college plans and potential careers for me. I once thought I was going to be an animal vet but after learning that math was required for it and I struggled with even standard algebra, I ruled out being one. Apparently even non-STEM fields require advanced math and it makes me feel like there are no potential careers I can go into. 
    My dad didn't want me to be diagnosed with it because he thought it made it seem like I was "stupid" or whatever, and told my doctor I "do fine at math" which wasn't and isn't true. I think having the diagnosis on file would have been helpful because if I knew that was an actual issue I would have been able to get assistance for it in middle + high school.

    I have to do a lot of tallying to do certain things without a calculator. Finger counting is even hard for me so I need to be able to visually record what I'm doing. lol I have also taken my states math exam for high schoolers probably 3 or so times so far, and my score got worse each time. My counselor gave me a waiver though so if I pass my classes this year I can graduate without doing the exam.

    Combination locks used to mess with me so much! One of my teachers got mad at me because I never used my locker, but I couldn't open it fast enough to have time to get stuff from it and then make it to my classes. It also took until the 2nd grade until I could tell time on an analog clock, I think.

    I haven't tried to program much, but the stuff I tried to learn I did okay at. I think it actually helped my math ability a bit, I don't know exactly how though.

    I've always wanted to be an anthropologist or be a veterinarian, but both of those things require a lot of math. A lot of careers do and I don't know if I could even get the degrees I'd need for those things since I (currently) wouldn't be able to pass even a basic math course. I can learn math via books and videos fine, but I can't remember it long enough to actually do anything with it. It's very odd and frustrating.
  • edited April 30
    I’ve seen people calculate fictional character speeds and destructive power with mathematics somehow. I can’t figure out how they do it. It’s made me fall behind in certain aspects of different fandoms. 

    I honestly got a psychotic episode due to the difficulty of a math class at the start of the tenth grade that I actually had to take some time off school and get an MRI on my brain done. I was moved to a less advanced class after that. 

    An underaged female stalker of mine also once passed me a note asking if I was good at math and could do her homework for her. 

    I wanted to be a paleontologist but my interest was always shot down by others. My father wanted me to become a veterinarian instead but stressed that I had to know math. I ran with that idea for a while but my struggles with even pre-algebra made me feel like doing something like that wasn’t in the cards. I now don’t know what I want to do and it’s not good because I am at the age where I can’t use the “I have plenty of time.” outlook as a crutch anymore. It’s also further proof that there is no “plan” by the Abrahamic god. Saying both “You have plenty of time!” and “God has a plan for you!” are deconstructive in the long term. 
  • I was absolutely useless at geometry.
  • AmityAmity Administrator, Citizen
    @Hylian I can relate and have Type 2 Dyscalculia, might aswell speak to me in a foriegn language. I loved learning about history, but the need to remember exact dates meant that I chose another subject to study instead. Same with economics, took that subject for a year, lol. Got through by memorising with a basic to no understanding.
    Yeah peoples judgemental perceptions were difficult to deal with, now though unless it will impact on my work/ability to pay my bills, I genuinely dont care what other people think about my math skills. Reminds me of the quote:

    “Those who mind don’t matter and those who matter don’t mind.”

    Some fun facts about Dyscalculia:
    Dyscalculia primarily affects the learning process in relation to Mathematics.

    Two of the types of dyscalculia that have been identified are:
    Type 1: developmental dyscalculia where students exhibit a marked discrepancy between their developmental level and general cognitive ability as it pertains to Mathematics. As a basic indicator of developmental dyscalculia students will perform below expectations with no obvious explanation (e.g. general ability, emotional state or illness) available.

    Type 2: dyscalculia where students exhibit a complete inability to manage mathematical concepts and numbers. It presents as an enduring condition that affects the ability to acquire mathematical skills despite appropriate teaching.

    Dyslexia and dyscalculia may co-exist, but not all students with dyslexia will have difficulties in Mathematics. However, dyslexia will affect all kinds of learning that depend on reading including Mathematics.

    Dyscalculia may manifest itself through the student’s inability to conceptualise number, number relationships and outcomes of numerical operations (estimating). Students variously exhibit difficulties in the following areas: computation, direction, laterality, mathematical concepts, mental Mathematics, money, omissions, reading and writing numbers, reversals, rote counting, rules and formulae, sequencing, and time and time management.

    Students may be unable to comprehend or ‘picture’ mechanical processes as they often lack ‘big picture’ thinking. Other symptoms of dyscalculia may be noted in poor athletic co-ordination, difficulty keeping scores during Physical Education and problems keeping track of whose turn it is during games.

    Transitioning between lessons, particularly at post-primary level may also be difficult. Students may also have a poor sense of direction, display a tendency to lose things and may seem absent minded. Additional problems may be seen in difficulties that arise in grasping concepts of formal music education such as reading music, and in students sometimes having poor name/face retrieval when recollecting individual’s names





  • BenderBender Citizen
    Amity said:
    @Hylian I can relate and have Type 2 Dyscalculia, might aswell speak to me in a foriegn language. I loved learning about history, but the need to remember exact dates meant that I chose another subject to study instead. Same with economics, took that subject for a year, lol. Got through by memorising with a basic to no understanding.
    Yeah peoples judgemental perceptions were difficult to deal with, now though unless it will impact on my work/ability to pay my bills, I genuinely dont care what other people think about my math skills. Reminds me of the quote:

    “Those who mind don’t matter and those who matter don’t mind.”

    Some fun facts about Dyscalculia:
    Dyscalculia primarily affects the learning process in relation to Mathematics.

    Two of the types of dyscalculia that have been identified are:
    Type 1: developmental dyscalculia where students exhibit a marked discrepancy between their developmental level and general cognitive ability as it pertains to Mathematics. As a basic indicator of developmental dyscalculia students will perform below expectations with no obvious explanation (e.g. general ability, emotional state or illness) available.

    Type 2: dyscalculia where students exhibit a complete inability to manage mathematical concepts and numbers. It presents as an enduring condition that affects the ability to acquire mathematical skills despite appropriate teaching.

    Dyslexia and dyscalculia may co-exist, but not all students with dyslexia will have difficulties in Mathematics. However, dyslexia will affect all kinds of learning that depend on reading including Mathematics.

    Dyscalculia may manifest itself through the student’s inability to conceptualise number, number relationships and outcomes of numerical operations (estimating). Students variously exhibit difficulties in the following areas: computation, direction, laterality, mathematical concepts, mental Mathematics, money, omissions, reading and writing numbers, reversals, rote counting, rules and formulae, sequencing, and time and time management.

    Students may be unable to comprehend or ‘picture’ mechanical processes as they often lack ‘big picture’ thinking. Other symptoms of dyscalculia may be noted in poor athletic co-ordination, difficulty keeping scores during Physical Education and problems keeping track of whose turn it is during games.

    Transitioning between lessons, particularly at post-primary level may also be difficult. Students may also have a poor sense of direction, display a tendency to lose things and may seem absent minded. Additional problems may be seen in difficulties that arise in grasping concepts of formal music education such as reading music, and in students sometimes having poor name/face retrieval when recollecting individual’s names

    This is so interesting. I don't think I have dyscalculia and never had any trouble with Maths, but I'm terrible with dates. I would use all kinds of tricks to remember historical dates or phone numbers (when that was still necessary lol), only to completely forget them again one week or month later. 

    The only way for me to remember a sequence of numbers is to be exposed to it daily or several times a week. Once that stops, the numbers vanish from my head. Very frustrating.
  • HylianHylian Citizen, Mentor
    Amity said:
    @Hylian I can relate and have Type 2 Dyscalculia, might aswell speak to me in a foriegn language. I loved learning about history, but the need to remember exact dates meant that I chose another subject to study instead. Same with economics, took that subject for a year, lol. Got through by memorising with a basic to no understanding.
    Yeah peoples judgemental perceptions were difficult to deal with, now though unless it will impact on my work/ability to pay my bills, I genuinely dont care what other people think about my math skills. Reminds me of the quote:

    “Those who mind don’t matter and those who matter don’t mind.”

    Some fun facts about Dyscalculia:
    Dyscalculia primarily affects the learning process in relation to Mathematics.

    Two of the types of dyscalculia that have been identified are:
    Type 1: developmental dyscalculia where students exhibit a marked discrepancy between their developmental level and general cognitive ability as it pertains to Mathematics. As a basic indicator of developmental dyscalculia students will perform below expectations with no obvious explanation (e.g. general ability, emotional state or illness) available.

    Type 2: dyscalculia where students exhibit a complete inability to manage mathematical concepts and numbers. It presents as an enduring condition that affects the ability to acquire mathematical skills despite appropriate teaching.

    Dyslexia and dyscalculia may co-exist, but not all students with dyslexia will have difficulties in Mathematics. However, dyslexia will affect all kinds of learning that depend on reading including Mathematics.

    Dyscalculia may manifest itself through the student’s inability to conceptualise number, number relationships and outcomes of numerical operations (estimating). Students variously exhibit difficulties in the following areas: computation, direction, laterality, mathematical concepts, mental Mathematics, money, omissions, reading and writing numbers, reversals, rote counting, rules and formulae, sequencing, and time and time management.

    Students may be unable to comprehend or ‘picture’ mechanical processes as they often lack ‘big picture’ thinking. Other symptoms of dyscalculia may be noted in poor athletic co-ordination, difficulty keeping scores during Physical Education and problems keeping track of whose turn it is during games.

    Transitioning between lessons, particularly at post-primary level may also be difficult. Students may also have a poor sense of direction, display a tendency to lose things and may seem absent minded. Additional problems may be seen in difficulties that arise in grasping concepts of formal music education such as reading music, and in students sometimes having poor name/face retrieval when recollecting individual’s names
    For me dyscalculia makes it hard to count beyond the 10s/20s, and I can't handle counting backwards. It also makes it hard to count money, which is stressful since I am worried that when I get a job I'll get in trouble for being too slow at it. I can't calculate the tax for things either unless I have a calculator.

    It makes a lot of simple things hard to do, and that makes me embarrassed since people often make fun of me. It also sucks because my brother who has Asperger's doesn't have issues like this and is really good at math, and I am compared to him a lot due to us both having autism.
  • HylianHylian Citizen, Mentor
    Bender said:
    Amity said:
    @Hylian I can relate and have Type 2 Dyscalculia, might aswell speak to me in a foriegn language. I loved learning about history, but the need to remember exact dates meant that I chose another subject to study instead. Same with economics, took that subject for a year, lol. Got through by memorising with a basic to no understanding.
    Yeah peoples judgemental perceptions were difficult to deal with, now though unless it will impact on my work/ability to pay my bills, I genuinely dont care what other people think about my math skills. Reminds me of the quote:

    “Those who mind don’t matter and those who matter don’t mind.”

    Some fun facts about Dyscalculia:
    Dyscalculia primarily affects the learning process in relation to Mathematics.

    Two of the types of dyscalculia that have been identified are:
    Type 1: developmental dyscalculia where students exhibit a marked discrepancy between their developmental level and general cognitive ability as it pertains to Mathematics. As a basic indicator of developmental dyscalculia students will perform below expectations with no obvious explanation (e.g. general ability, emotional state or illness) available.

    Type 2: dyscalculia where students exhibit a complete inability to manage mathematical concepts and numbers. It presents as an enduring condition that affects the ability to acquire mathematical skills despite appropriate teaching.

    Dyslexia and dyscalculia may co-exist, but not all students with dyslexia will have difficulties in Mathematics. However, dyslexia will affect all kinds of learning that depend on reading including Mathematics.

    Dyscalculia may manifest itself through the student’s inability to conceptualise number, number relationships and outcomes of numerical operations (estimating). Students variously exhibit difficulties in the following areas: computation, direction, laterality, mathematical concepts, mental Mathematics, money, omissions, reading and writing numbers, reversals, rote counting, rules and formulae, sequencing, and time and time management.

    Students may be unable to comprehend or ‘picture’ mechanical processes as they often lack ‘big picture’ thinking. Other symptoms of dyscalculia may be noted in poor athletic co-ordination, difficulty keeping scores during Physical Education and problems keeping track of whose turn it is during games.

    Transitioning between lessons, particularly at post-primary level may also be difficult. Students may also have a poor sense of direction, display a tendency to lose things and may seem absent minded. Additional problems may be seen in difficulties that arise in grasping concepts of formal music education such as reading music, and in students sometimes having poor name/face retrieval when recollecting individual’s names
    This is so interesting. I don't think I have dyscalculia and never had any trouble with Maths, but I'm terrible with dates. I would use all kinds of tricks to remember historical dates or phone numbers (when that was still necessary lol), only to completely forget them again one week or month later. 

    The only way for me to remember a sequence of numbers is to be exposed to it daily or several times a week. Once that stops, the numbers vanish from my head. Very frustrating.
    This is kind of my issue with the things that I can learn to do. I've found out how to get learning math to "work" for me, but if I don't practice every little bit of it often I just entirely forget how to do things. I can relearn them fine, but I don't think it's feasible for me to go into a lot of the jobs I want to do since I can't just continuously reteach myself everything beyond multiplication.
  • AmityAmity Administrator, Citizen
    edited April 30
    Hylian said:
    Amity said:
    @Hylian I can relate and have Type 2 Dyscalculia, might aswell speak to me in a foriegn language. I loved learning about history, but the need to remember exact dates meant that I chose another subject to study instead. Same with economics, took that subject for a year, lol. Got through by memorising with a basic to no understanding.
    Yeah peoples judgemental perceptions were difficult to deal with, now though unless it will impact on my work/ability to pay my bills, I genuinely dont care what other people think about my math skills. Reminds me of the quote:

    “Those who mind don’t matter and those who matter don’t mind.”

    Some fun facts about Dyscalculia:
    Dyscalculia primarily affects the learning process in relation to Mathematics.

    Two of the types of dyscalculia that have been identified are:
    Type 1: developmental dyscalculia where students exhibit a marked discrepancy between their developmental level and general cognitive ability as it pertains to Mathematics. As a basic indicator of developmental dyscalculia students will perform below expectations with no obvious explanation (e.g. general ability, emotional state or illness) available.

    Type 2: dyscalculia where students exhibit a complete inability to manage mathematical concepts and numbers. It presents as an enduring condition that affects the ability to acquire mathematical skills despite appropriate teaching.

    Dyslexia and dyscalculia may co-exist, but not all students with dyslexia will have difficulties in Mathematics. However, dyslexia will affect all kinds of learning that depend on reading including Mathematics.

    Dyscalculia may manifest itself through the student’s inability to conceptualise number, number relationships and outcomes of numerical operations (estimating). Students variously exhibit difficulties in the following areas: computation, direction, laterality, mathematical concepts, mental Mathematics, money, omissions, reading and writing numbers, reversals, rote counting, rules and formulae, sequencing, and time and time management.

    Students may be unable to comprehend or ‘picture’ mechanical processes as they often lack ‘big picture’ thinking. Other symptoms of dyscalculia may be noted in poor athletic co-ordination, difficulty keeping scores during Physical Education and problems keeping track of whose turn it is during games.

    Transitioning between lessons, particularly at post-primary level may also be difficult. Students may also have a poor sense of direction, display a tendency to lose things and may seem absent minded. Additional problems may be seen in difficulties that arise in grasping concepts of formal music education such as reading music, and in students sometimes having poor name/face retrieval when recollecting individual’s names
    For me dyscalculia makes it hard to count beyond the 10s/20s, and I can't handle counting backwards. It also makes it hard to count money, which is stressful since I am worried that when I get a job I'll get in trouble for being too slow at it. I can't calculate the tax for things either unless I have a calculator.

    It makes a lot of simple things hard to do, and that makes me embarrassed since people often make fun of me. It also sucks because my brother who has Asperger's doesn't have issues like this and is really good at math, and I am compared to him a lot due to us both having autism.

    If the numbers would stay still and not move around between reading the page and getting to my brain that would remove a barrier to solving basic number problems.

    I remember that copying from the blackboard to the exercise book was exhausting and that was before I had even thought about how to solve the problem. Back in my day (lol) teacher training courses didnt even have a special educational needs element (it was only introduced in the late 1990s), so you were treated like a lazy child for not trying harder. Fun times.

    Im sorry your home life is unsupportive Hylian, all I can say without derailing the topic is that they are wrong, biased and their opinions on dyscalculia belong to uneducated people.
  • Mona_PerethMona_Pereth Citizen

    Hylian said:

    I haven't tried to program much, but the stuff I tried to learn I did okay at. I think it actually helped my math ability a bit, I don't know exactly how though.

    VERY interesting.  Programming, even basic programming, actually entails what is traditionally considered to be fairly advanced  mathematical ability.  Traditionally, many colleges don't allow students to take even basic programming courses until after they had had pre-calculus.

    This is starting to change, now that educators are developing new, creative, graphically-oriented ways to teach basic programming in gradeschool.  But, until these kids grow up, it still seems to be true that most people can't handle programming unless they can also handle pre-calculus.

    I should also mention that I know one person very well who has always had trouble with basic arithmetic, yet who understands many more advanced mathematical concepts just fine -- at least on a conceptual level, though he has trouble with what he calls the "mechanics" of math.

    Hylian said:
    Bender said:
    Amity said:
    @Hylian I can relate and have Type 2 Dyscalculia, might aswell speak to me in a foriegn language. I loved learning about history, but the need to remember exact dates meant that I chose another subject to study instead. Same with economics, took that subject for a year, lol. Got through by memorising with a basic to no understanding.
    Yeah peoples judgemental perceptions were difficult to deal with, now though unless it will impact on my work/ability to pay my bills, I genuinely dont care what other people think about my math skills. Reminds me of the quote:

    “Those who mind don’t matter and those who matter don’t mind.”

    Some fun facts about Dyscalculia:
    Dyscalculia primarily affects the learning process in relation to Mathematics.

    Two of the types of dyscalculia that have been identified are:
    Type 1: developmental dyscalculia where students exhibit a marked discrepancy between their developmental level and general cognitive ability as it pertains to Mathematics. As a basic indicator of developmental dyscalculia students will perform below expectations with no obvious explanation (e.g. general ability, emotional state or illness) available.

    Type 2: dyscalculia where students exhibit a complete inability to manage mathematical concepts and numbers. It presents as an enduring condition that affects the ability to acquire mathematical skills despite appropriate teaching.

    Dyslexia and dyscalculia may co-exist, but not all students with dyslexia will have difficulties in Mathematics. However, dyslexia will affect all kinds of learning that depend on reading including Mathematics.

    Dyscalculia may manifest itself through the student’s inability to conceptualise number, number relationships and outcomes of numerical operations (estimating). Students variously exhibit difficulties in the following areas: computation, direction, laterality, mathematical concepts, mental Mathematics, money, omissions, reading and writing numbers, reversals, rote counting, rules and formulae, sequencing, and time and time management.

    Students may be unable to comprehend or ‘picture’ mechanical processes as they often lack ‘big picture’ thinking. Other symptoms of dyscalculia may be noted in poor athletic co-ordination, difficulty keeping scores during Physical Education and problems keeping track of whose turn it is during games.

    Transitioning between lessons, particularly at post-primary level may also be difficult. Students may also have a poor sense of direction, display a tendency to lose things and may seem absent minded. Additional problems may be seen in difficulties that arise in grasping concepts of formal music education such as reading music, and in students sometimes having poor name/face retrieval when recollecting individual’s names
    This is so interesting. I don't think I have dyscalculia and never had any trouble with Maths, but I'm terrible with dates. I would use all kinds of tricks to remember historical dates or phone numbers (when that was still necessary lol), only to completely forget them again one week or month later. 

    The only way for me to remember a sequence of numbers is to be exposed to it daily or several times a week. Once that stops, the numbers vanish from my head. Very frustrating.
    This is kind of my issue with the things that I can learn to do. I've found out how to get learning math to "work" for me, but if I don't practice every little bit of it often I just entirely forget how to do things. I can relearn them fine, but I don't think it's feasible for me to go into a lot of the jobs I want to do since I can't just continuously reteach myself everything beyond multiplication.

    Given what you've said here, I wonder whether you truly have full-blown dyscalculia, or whether you just have some combination of (1) an unusual math learning style,  (2) a much greater-than-normal need for practice, and (3) math anxiety.

    What do you think would happen if you were to get deeper into programming?

    If programming actually did help your math ability, in whatever mysterious way, do you think this might be worth trying?

    (If so, it could potentially open up a lot of career possibilities.)
  • I think I have to take one more math class before I can get an Associate’s Degree but the idea feels daunting. 

    But what really gets me down about dyscalculia is that it robbed me of my ability to read sheet music. I also can’t write any songs because of it. 
  • HylianHylian Citizen, Mentor

    Hylian said:

    I haven't tried to program much, but the stuff I tried to learn I did okay at. I think it actually helped my math ability a bit, I don't know exactly how though.

    VERY interesting.  Programming, even basic programming, actually entails what is traditionally considered to be fairly advanced  mathematical ability.  Traditionally, many colleges don't allow students to take even basic programming courses until after they had had pre-calculus.

    This is starting to change, now that educators are developing new, creative, graphically-oriented ways to teach basic programming in gradeschool.  But, until these kids grow up, it still seems to be true that most people can't handle programming unless they can also handle pre-calculus.

    I should also mention that I know one person very well who has always had trouble with basic arithmetic, yet who understands many more advanced mathematical concepts just fine -- at least on a conceptual level, though he has trouble with what he calls the "mechanics" of math.

    Hylian said:
    This is kind of my issue with the things that I can learn to do. I've found out how to get learning math to "work" for me, but if I don't practice every little bit of it often I just entirely forget how to do things. I can relearn them fine, but I don't think it's feasible for me to go into a lot of the jobs I want to do since I can't just continuously reteach myself everything beyond multiplication.

    Given what you've said here, I wonder whether you truly have full-blown dyscalculia, or whether you just have some combination of (1) an unusual math learning style,  (2) a much greater-than-normal need for practice, and (3) math anxiety.

    What do you think would happen if you were to get deeper into programming?

    If programming actually did help your math ability, in whatever mysterious way, do you think this might be worth trying?

    (If so, it could potentially open up a lot of career possibilities.)
    I actually didn't know that it needed an advanced math ability. I tried to learn C++ and did okay at it, but I did use a guide that had visual examples and specific programs it was teaching people to make, so they could learn how things functioned. I did understand how the things I was doing worked and picked it up relatively fine, but I don't know if I would have done as good without that type of guide.

    I think I am good at getting the concepts of math now that I've figured out what works to help me learn it, and I could definitely learn the stuff I need to go into a career I want. I think my hesitation is more about, if would it be worth it to expend the energy that it would take for me to remember all the math that's needed, since I forget it so easily and need to practice it so much.

    If I kept programming and it continued to help my math ability I would be very happy about that. I actually did want to get into software development before, so if I did okay at programming and had an easier time with math due to it that'd open up another career opportunity.
  • Mona_PerethMona_Pereth Citizen
    edited May 1
    Hylian said:

    Hylian said:

    I haven't tried to program much, but the stuff I tried to learn I did okay at. I think it actually helped my math ability a bit, I don't know exactly how though.

    VERY interesting.  Programming, even basic programming, actually entails what is traditionally considered to be fairly advanced  mathematical ability.  Traditionally, many colleges don't allow students to take even basic programming courses until after they had had pre-calculus.

    This is starting to change, now that educators are developing new, creative, graphically-oriented ways to teach basic programming in gradeschool.  But, until these kids grow up, it still seems to be true that most people can't handle programming unless they can also handle pre-calculus.

    I should also mention that I know one person very well who has always had trouble with basic arithmetic, yet who understands many more advanced mathematical concepts just fine -- at least on a conceptual level, though he has trouble with what he calls the "mechanics" of math.

    Hylian said:
    This is kind of my issue with the things that I can learn to do. I've found out how to get learning math to "work" for me, but if I don't practice every little bit of it often I just entirely forget how to do things. I can relearn them fine, but I don't think it's feasible for me to go into a lot of the jobs I want to do since I can't just continuously reteach myself everything beyond multiplication.

    Given what you've said here, I wonder whether you truly have full-blown dyscalculia, or whether you just have some combination of (1) an unusual math learning style,  (2) a much greater-than-normal need for practice, and (3) math anxiety.

    What do you think would happen if you were to get deeper into programming?

    If programming actually did help your math ability, in whatever mysterious way, do you think this might be worth trying?

    (If so, it could potentially open up a lot of career possibilities.)
    I actually didn't know that it needed an advanced math ability. I tried to learn C++ and did okay at it, but I did use a guide that had visual examples and specific programs it was teaching people to make, so they could learn how things functioned. I did understand how the things I was doing worked and picked it up relatively fine, but I don't know if I would have done as good without that type of guide.
    So maybe "that type of guide" is what you need in order to learn.

    Perhaps a more graphical/visual/geometric approach to math would help you learn math better, too, than the traditional method of writing symbols on a chalkboard?

    These days, on YouTube and elsewhere, there are a lot of videos that teach advanced mathematical concepts in a very intuitive way using animations.  Have you ever looked at any of these?


    Hylian said:

    I think I am good at getting the concepts of math now that I've figured out what works to help me learn it, and I could definitely learn the stuff I need to go into a career I want. I think my hesitation is more about, if would it be worth it to expend the energy that it would take for me to remember all the math that's needed, since I forget it so easily and need to practice it so much.

    I think it would be worth your while to:

    1) Get deeper into programming, and

    2) Look around for highly visual math tutorial material, possibly including animations, to see if you can find anything that helps you understand math concepts in a deeper way than you now do.  Such deeper understanding would probably help you remember it better.


    Hylian said:

    If I kept programming and it continued to help my math ability I would be very happy about that. I actually did want to get into software development before, so if I did okay at programming and had an easier time with math due to it that'd open up another career opportunity.

    I hope you find a way to succeed.

  • HylianHylian Citizen, Mentor
    Hylian said:
    I actually didn't know that it needed an advanced math ability. I tried to learn C++ and did okay at it, but I did use a guide that had visual examples and specific programs it was teaching people to make, so they could learn how things functioned. I did understand how the things I was doing worked and picked it up relatively fine, but I don't know if I would have done as good without that type of guide.
    So maybe "that type of guide" is what you need in order to learn.

    Perhaps a more graphical/visual/geometric approach to math would help you learn math better, too, than the traditional method of writing symbols on a chalkboard?

    These days, on YouTube and elsewhere, there are a lot of videos that teach advanced mathematical concepts in a very intuitive way using animations.  Have you ever looked at any of these?


    Hylian said:

    I think I am good at getting the concepts of math now that I've figured out what works to help me learn it, and I could definitely learn the stuff I need to go into a career I want. I think my hesitation is more about, if would it be worth it to expend the energy that it would take for me to remember all the math that's needed, since I forget it so easily and need to practice it so much.

    I think it would be worth your while to:

    1) Get deeper into programming, and

    2) Look around for highly visual math tutorial material, possibly including animations, to see if you can find anything that helps you understand math concepts in a deeper way than you now do.  Such deeper understanding would probably help you remember it better.


    Hylian said:

    If I kept programming and it continued to help my math ability I would be very happy about that. I actually did want to get into software development before, so if I did okay at programming and had an easier time with math due to it that'd open up another career opportunity.

    I hope you find a way to succeed.

    I don't think I've watched a lot of those videos. I'll give those a try, they seem like they will be helpful. I'll also definitely try programming more.

    Thank you for your advice, Mona! I really appreciate it. 😊


  • verityverity Administrator, Citizen

  • Lost_DragonLost_Dragon Citizen, Member
    edited May 7
    I don't have an official diagnosis, but my issues have been flagged up numerous times throughout my life. I started falling behind at a young age and it was very noticeable. 

    My issues can make things like telling the time difficult. I can't understand clocks with roman numerals, I know logically I should be able to because they still work on the same system (the top symbol where twelve usually is still represents twelve, it's just a different symbol).  However, I seem to reach a mental block and it takes me so long to read the clock that the time actually changes and I get an inaccurate reading. I hate analogue clocks and I also hate it when people describe time as "forty minutes to" or "twenty minutes from". Please just say it like a digital clock. 

    The best way I can think to describe it is when you see someone who usually wears glasses and then you see them without glasses and you don't recognise them in a crowded public area. I can only understand certain visual information in particular contexts and when taken out of the original context I find it difficult. 

    Dividing is the absolute worst, especially odd numbers. I often have the issue of dividing, adding, multiplying or subtracting from the wrong column. However, if you turn the page horizontal and it is on lined paper then it is easier to keep within the same column, I also circle the symbol to remind myself what I'm doing so I don't start subtracting when I meant to add. Calculators are very helpful and I tend to use them, even for calculations that are apparently easy, which can lead to judgement but I'd rather get things accurate then chance it. 

    Likewise, if I'm counting and it's going up to big numbers, sometimes I partially zone out and end up counting backwards unintentionally and forgetting what number I was on. Mental maths is next to impossible, I need to see it in front of me to actually keep a record of what I'm doing otherwise I lose track of where I am and things get very confusing.  

    I find it difficult to understand how big numbers are (sometimes when people sprout statistics at me I don't know which number is bigger and which is smaller). Estimating can be tricky, I also struggle with understanding measurements and directions. Sometimes I read numbers backwards such as forty-two becoming twenty-four. I just have to remember to double check these things, otherwise I show up on the wrong date to events, show up to the wrong room number, show up at the wrong hour etc. 

    How on Earth people can take information such as "Daisy wants to travel twenty four miles west and travels at thirty miles an hour, how long will that take her?" and figure it out is beyond me. I struggle with time management because I often either over-estimate or under-estimate how long an activity will take. 

    Edit : As for subjects, I chose digital art. I do some coding and it can be tricky at times. The languages I use are typically syntax-first object-orientated and only on a surface level. I prefer to work on the visual design of programs. Designing game and app art. Working out how it would work and function in practice which ideally I would send off to a developer team. I want to go into graphic design, specifically UI design. 
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