Archeology

AmityAmity Administrator, Citizen

Anyone else have an interest in historic monuments or in archeology? Why do you like it? What interests you most?

I love going to places where people have gathered or lived back as far as the stone age, I get a sense of grounded-ness from it, a type of reminder that we are all just caretakers passing thorough this world.

Going to medieval ruins, castles, old settlements, a mound or the remains of a ring-fort in a field can be fascinating to me, the best part is researching it beforehand and then the new areas it leads onto.
For example a visit to Dunluce castle in County Antrim NI led onto visiting other castles/ruins where Gallowglass https://irishorigenes.com/content/gallowglass-do-you-belong-warrior-clan warriors played a key role in the regions history.

Comments

  • HylianHylian Citizen, Mentor

    I find the remains of ancient humans really fascinating. I like looking up things about human evolution, but just looking at fossils of hominids is cool.

    There's a species related to us, Paranthropus aethiopicus, that has one of those sagittal crests on the top of its skull (a ridge that allows for a stronger jaw).

  • kraftiekortiekraftiekortie Citizen
    edited February 4

    That was my "special interest" in late primary/early secondary school. I used to pretend to be a caveman. I would carry spears to the supermarket and "hunt" for food.

    I got into it after a field trip to a museum when I was in 6th grade---where there was an exhibit of Louis Leakey and his human and australopithecine fossils at Olduvai Gorge in Tanzania, East Africa.

    I would walk through Central Park thinking about girls and thinking about paleoanthropology and thinking about going out of digs.

  • HylianHylian Citizen, Mentor

    @kraftiekortie said:
    That was my "special interest" in late primary/early secondary school. I used to pretend to be a caveman. I would carry spears to the supermarket and "hunt" for food.

    I got into it after a field trip to a museum when I was in 6th grade---where there was an exhibit of Louis Leakey and his human and australopithecine fossils at Olduvai Gorge in Tanzania, East Africa.

    I would walk through Central Park thinking about girls and thinking about paleoanthropology and thinking about going out of digs.

    As a kid I was obsessed with monkeys and apes, and that carried over to adulthood, but now my interest is more about great apes and human evolution. I used to pretend to be an ape and I perfected making chimp noises. lol

    I don't know where I got my interest from. I think I just noticed how human-like primates are and it interested me.

    Also, I just realized I don't even know if what I talked about is related to archeology. People have to dig up fossils so I just assumed it was related. lol

  • It is intimately related to archaeology--the old castles.

    When one digs in the old castles, one frequently finds reminders of the people and culture who lived in those old castles. That's archaeology in a nutshell.

    There are people who even dig up something like early 20th century houses, looking for artifacts from that time.

  • @Amity said:

    I get a sense of grounded-ness from it, a type of reminder that we are all just caretakers passing thorough this world.

    I love this quote! That's exactly how I feel with any sort of history or artefact.

    I did a research project on Archaeology when I was about nine. It was my first comprehensive research. I still have it (I should scan the drawings lol).

    I don't know a lot about it now as an adult, but I still find it fascinating and I love that feeling of grounded-ness. I get the same rush from ancestry, genealogy, or my 19C studies.

  • AmityAmity Administrator, Citizen

    I wasnt sure how to word the title @Hylian, archeology seemed broad enough...

    Yes @Kraftiekortie anything broadly related is perfect too.

    When I have time I woukd love to properly investigate my ancestry.

    Thanks @Isabella, its like a spiritual wellness for me.

  • BenderBender Citizen

    My wife studied Archaeology and later Anthropology. We bonded a lot over related things and we both collect antiques and love travelling to see old sites, buildings or ruins. Or history-oriented museums.

    @Amity said:
    I get a sense of grounded-ness from it, a type of reminder that we are all just caretakers passing thorough this world.

    I get a strong feeling of inner peace in such places, being reminded of the fleeting nature of my own existence is somehow very reassuring.

    We didn't travel that much lately, so in the last 3 years I've only seen the old walls and fortress in Tallinn (the old medieval city is one of the best-preserved in Europe), build in the 14th-15th century, and Port de Hal, the old city gate in Bruxelles (14th century). They both have great museums inside.

  • BenderBender Citizen

    Tallinn:

    Porte de Hal:

  • magpiemagpie Citizen
    edited February 5

    I'm fascinated with times of transition - decline of Neanderthals, Neolithic Revolution, Late Bronze Age Collapse, fall of the Roman Empire.
    I actually believe we're living in one of such periods.

    Also, I love to check the Fossil & Ruins part on sciencedaily. The most exciting news for me was that apparently Neanderthals invented string https://www.bbc.com/news/world-europe-52267383 That may feel trivial from today's perspective but it's definitely not. It shows their mental capacities weren't inferior to anatomically modern humans. Other factors must have contributed to their decline.

  • BenderBender Citizen

    @magpie said:
    I'm fascinated with times of transition - decline of Neanderthals, Neolithic Revolution, Late Bronze Age Collapse, fall of the Roman Empire.
    I actually believe we're living in one of such periods.

    I believe you are probably correct.

  • We’re living in the transition, I believe, between “modern” and “post-modern.”

    This has been the state of affairs since approximately the 90s, when the Internet started becoming available to a wider scope of people.

  • magpiemagpie Citizen

    @kraftiekortie said:
    We’re living in the transition, I believe, between “modern” and “post-modern.”

    This has been the state of affairs since approximately the 90s, when the Internet started becoming available to a wider scope of people.

    I have a feeling that the transition started with Industrial Revolution and it's been only gaining momentum since then.

  • @Bender said:

    @magpie said:
    I'm fascinated with times of transition - decline of Neanderthals, Neolithic Revolution, Late Bronze Age Collapse, fall of the Roman Empire.
    I actually believe we're living in one of such periods.

    I believe you are probably correct.

    This is my thought too.

  • I feel like there’s a sharp demarcation between life pre-Internet and smartphone, and now.

    Even in the “third world,” mobile phones were part of a great revolution in terms of many things.

  • AmityAmity Administrator, Citizen

    @magpie said:
    I'm fascinated with times of transition - decline of Neanderthals, Neolithic Revolution, Late Bronze Age Collapse, fall of the Roman Empire.
    I actually believe we're living in one of such periods.

    Also, I love to check the Fossil & Ruins part on sciencedaily. The most exciting news for me was that apparently Neanderthals invented string https://www.bbc.com/news/world-europe-52267383 That may feel trivial from today's perspective but it's definitely not. It shows their mental capacities weren't inferior to anatomically modern humans. Other factors must have contributed to their decline.

    Times of transition are interesting to me as well, not sure if this would be of interest, but I love this guys documentaries, this one is on Doggerland.

    This channel has a series on the Fall of Civilisations, originally a podcast made into but the depth of information is very satisfying https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCT6Y5JJPKe_JDMivpKgVXew

    @Hylian this one might be of interest to you

  • AmityAmity Administrator, Citizen

    @Bender said:
    My wife studied Archaeology and later Anthropology. We bonded a lot over related things and we both collect antiques and love travelling to see old sites, buildings or ruins. Or history-oriented museums.

    @Amity said:
    I get a sense of grounded-ness from it, a type of reminder that we are all just caretakers passing thorough this world.

    I get a strong feeling of inner peace in such places, being reminded of the fleeting nature of my own existence is somehow very reassuring.

    We didn't travel that much lately, so in the last 3 years I've only seen the old walls and fortress in Tallinn (the old medieval city is one of the best-preserved in Europe), build in the 14th-15th century, and Port de Hal, the old city gate in Bruxelles (14th century). They both have great museums inside.

    Oh wow Tallinn looks amazing

  • BenderBender Citizen
    ^
    I fell in love with it. While working in Helsinki for a bit more than a year, I would regularly jump the pond to Tallinn (every couple of months): the dining out/drinking for pleasure (not to get wasted on cheap stuff) culture is miles ahead of any other Nordic country I've been in. They have amazing cuisine, along with a lot of wonderful artisanal shops, good English and service. 

    I definitely plan to go back once I can travel again.
  • “We had no idea about this kingdom. In a flash, we had profound new information on the Iron Age Middle East,” said Prof. James Osborne of the Oriental Institute, an archaeologist who specializes in examining Iron Age cities. Osborne and colleagues have discovered what looks like a major political center in ancient Turkey from about 2700 years ago — and we knew nothing about it.


    https://www.zmescience.com/science/archaeology/turkey-unknown-kingdom-04022021/


  • AmityAmity Administrator, Citizen
    Ahh travel, such a treat, so many places I would love to visit. I enjoy walking through the 'old town' parts of cities, Malta has some beautiful citadels
    Mdina:

    And on Gozo

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