Covid-19 Talk

This is a thread to talk about Covid-19. How it's affecting you, how you feel about it, what you think about it. This is a controversial topic in some cases, so needless to say let's keep it civil please.

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Comments

  • Teach51Teach51 Citizen
    edited December 2020

    Well, I will be asked to be vaccinated against Covid19 next week and I don't think I will. I am in the high risk category but I still am apprehensive regarding the safety of the vaccine. People who fail to agree will not be allowed to fly, go to restaurants or large gatherings unless they have a current, negative test result. I'm fine with that. Would you get vaccinated?

  • I'm apprehensive too, but the vaccine isn't widely available here until next summer. I'll take the advice of my daughter's doctors. She can't get vaccines herself because she has no immune system, but I'll see what they say. In the meantime we're staying on lockdown for her safety, and my mother's.

  • I’m up for getting vaccinated, but also have concerns about our governments “speed test” procedure.
    But that’s more for other people: I’m 38 with no relevant pre-existing health conditions so by the time I’m up for being offered it there should be clarity re: side effects... hope there aren’t any for the sake of the very elderly and frontline NHS staff who are in the current first tranche of the population to receive it.

  • kraftiekortiekraftiekortie Citizen
    edited December 2020

    I probably won't receive my vaccine until the spring. My wife will get her vaccine very soon, though, because she works as a nurse in a nursing home.

    My mother just took the "rapid" COVID test last Tuesday. She was negative.

    I believe they will find that the health care workers (2) in the UK who had a bad reaction to the Pfizer vaccine were allergic to the preservatives in the vaccine itself.

  • I need to have two operations soon, one rather easy, the other significantly more complicated and I am concerned that the vaccine will weaken my immune system pre-surgery. The vaccine seems to be the lesser of two evils considering how serious Covid19 is for the over sixties, meaning me.🙃 My instinct tells me to find a heath professional I really trust and follow his advice. I remind myself that most things in life are risky to a certain extent. A friend of mine was crippled by a car when crossing the road on a zebra crossing, everything is a calculated risk I suppose.

  • Statest16Statest16 Citizen, Mentor

    @Teach51 said:
    I need to have two operations soon, one rather easy, the other significantly more complicated and I am concerned that the vaccine will weaken my immune system pre-surgery. The vaccine seems to be the lesser of two evils considering how serious Covid19 is for the over sixties, meaning me.🙃 My instinct tells me to find a heath professional I really trust and follow his advice. I remind myself that most things in life are risky to a certain extent. A friend of mine was crippled by a car when crossing the road on a zebra crossing, everything is a calculated risk I suppose.

    If at all possible you might want to hold off on surgery until Covid ends because without the vaccine hospitals may not be a good place to be.And if the vaccine interferes with surgery,if you can wait try to wait.

  • Statest16Statest16 Citizen, Mentor

    My county will have vaccine soon but only first responders like police,fire and hospital and doctor office medical.In other words only available for highest risk.I doubt I will ever take the vaccine,1.why not give it to someone higher risk and 2.By the time it gets to me everyone who's high risk will have gotten it and I won't really need it.

  • I know Statest. I cannot postpone my surgery but that is a wise suggestion for those who can.

  • @kraftiekortie said:
    I probably won't receive my vaccine until the spring. My wife will get her vaccine very soon, though, because she works as a nurse in a nursing home.

    My mother just took the "rapid" COVID test last Tuesday. She was negative.

    I believe they will find that the health care workers (2) in the UK who had a bad reaction to the Pfizer vaccine were allergic to the preservatives in the vaccine itself.

    Good news about your mother.

    Yeah: with only two adverse reactions so far either allergy or undiagnosed underlying condition would be the most likely explanations.

  • Teach51Teach51 Citizen
    edited December 2020

    Kraftie would you still need the vaccine even though you have had Covid? It would be interesting to see if you have immunity now. Your wife didn't catch it from you did she?
    Nursing home employees are the most closely vetted over here also and have weekly testing. They will be the first along with front line medical staff and the elderly to be vaccinated.

  • HylianHylian Citizen, Mentor

    I will be getting the vaccine once it's available. One of the reasons why people who are not high risk need to get it is because they provide herd immunity for those who cannot get the vaccine. Not everyone who is high risk can actually get it, some people have issues with their immune system where vaccines do not work as their bodies do not produce enough antibodies. These people require the rest of the population getting the vaccine, so I will be getting it for the high risk members of my family and those who cannot get vaccines.

  • I still need the vaccine because I don't have permanent immunity.

    It should be noted that the immunity you get from having the flu lasts only a year or so.

  • @Teach51 said:
    I need to have two operations soon, one rather easy, the other significantly more complicated and I am concerned that the vaccine will weaken my immune system pre-surgery. The vaccine seems to be the lesser of two evils considering how serious Covid19 is for the over sixties, meaning me.🙃 My instinct tells me to find a heath professional I really trust and follow his advice. I remind myself that most things in life are risky to a certain extent. A friend of mine was crippled by a car when crossing the road on a zebra crossing, everything is a calculated risk I suppose.

    I believe that getting a vaccine actually strengthens your immune system. I’d have to look that up though. I’d talk to your surgeon about that.

  • WulfniteWulfnite Citizen
    edited December 2020

    @Teach51 said:
    Well, I will be asked to be vaccinated against Covid19 next week and I don't think I will. I am in the high risk category but I still am apprehensive regarding the safety of the vaccine. People who fail to agree will not be allowed to fly, go to restaurants or large gatherings unless they have a current, negative test result. I'm fine with that. Would you get vaccinated?

    I'm expecting also people being required to get vaccinated in order to keep their jobs. Either by the government, their employer or both. For many I see the potential of it becoming 'get vaccinated or else'.

  • I understand the “civil liberties” aspect—but we must get rid of COVID. Vaccinating much of the population will go a long way towards that goal.

    Think about what would have happened had there been substantial refusal of the polio vaccine, of the smallpox vaccine.

    Even pre-COVID19, children going to public school had to get vaccine—or else.....

  • My only reservation is regarding the short cuts taken in the vaccine's development. My son is an "anti -vaccine" activist, had he lived in the era before the Smallpox, Polio, TB, Diptheria vaccines, or even antibiotics, I am convinced that he would hold a completely different view. When I was a child Strep throat could be fatal. So many kids were in calipers due to contracting polio when I was a kid.
    I am very apprehensive about this vaccine. If the main concern is a brief, allergic reaction then that calms me a bit.😜

  • @kraftiekortie said:
    I understand the “civil liberties” aspect—but we must get rid of COVID. Vaccinating much of the population will go a long way towards that goal.

    Think about what would have happened had there been substantial refusal of the polio vaccine, of the smallpox vaccine.

    Even pre-COVID19, children going to public school had to get vaccine—or else.....

    Do you think they'll be able to completely eradicate it?

  • Statest16Statest16 Citizen, Mentor

    I would think they could come close to eradication but today you still get a bubonic plague once in a while.

    Covid-19 is a coronavirus and is related to the common cold and flu,if China doesn't clean it's wet markets we could get another strain of the coronavirus like Covid-23(not real just example) or something maybe

  • They won’t completely eradicate COVID-19, but it can potentially become something like the flu.

    Less lethal than what it is now. Joining all the other “things that are going around.”

  • @kraftiekortie said:
    They won’t completely eradicate COVID-19, but it can potentially become something like the flu.

    Less lethal than what it is now. Joining all the other “things that are going around.”

    That's what I'd like to see happen.

  • Australia abandoned the trial of a vaccine it had in development because test subjects who received the experimental vaccine were having false positives on an HIV test. I did read long ago that the Covid-19 virus appeared to have HIV related components in it.

  • Prometheus81Prometheus81 Citizen, Member
    edited December 2020

    edited by verity - disputed by fact checkers https://www.reuters.com/article/uk-factcheck-chart-us-death-figures-2020-idUSKBN2872MV

    Latest figure from the CDC for total deaths in the USA rounded to nearest thousand.

    2015 2.712 million people.
    2016 2.744 million people.
    2017 2.813 million people.
    2018 2.839 million people.
    2019 2.855 million people.
    2020 2.818 million people.

    A terrifying virus that demands the perpetual surrender of all our liberties.

  • Prometheus81Prometheus81 Citizen, Member
    edited December 2020

    Covid figures from Italy:

    There are 24 million people under 40.
    Death rate for under 40's 0.00006%.
    163 deaths under 40 in total
    17 deaths under 40 with no underlying conditions.

    [Comment removed by moderator]

  • I guess I’m “beyond help,” then 😉

    There have been about 300,000 deaths in the US from COVID and probable COVID.

    We have to think about the potential of COVID, in addition to the actuality of COVID.

  • @Prometheus81 said:
    Covid figures from Italy:

    There are 24 million people under 40.
    Death rate for under 40's 0.00006%.
    163 deaths under 40 in total
    17 deaths under 40 with no underlying conditions.

    If people still can't see we're in the grip of mass hysteria, they're beyond help.

    It’s your opinion the world is suffering from mass hysteria. There are smart people who disagree with you.

    It might be better to express it as your opinion, rather than me, Kortie and others are “beyond help. “

  • Prometheus81Prometheus81 Citizen, Member

    Please provide factual data contrary to that which I myself have provided to back up your claim that the response to COVID is anything other than mass hysteria.

  • You have missed my point. Whether your data is factual or not is irrelevant to the question.

    The problem arises from the conclusions you draw from the data. Your conclusions are an opinion, not fact. And many people far more learned and experienced than anyone on this forum would disagree that those taking the viral pandemic seriously are “in the grip of mass hysteria.”

    If I understand the philosophy upon which NV is built, we want to try to avoid insulting others. That is why I suggested reframing your opinion. ❤

  • Prometheus81Prometheus81 Citizen, Member

    Given that the death rate for the year so far does not exceed what would be expected in a typical year, there is no other logically possible conclusion but that COVID is substantially less serious than is ordinarily supposed. This means that the extreme and unprecedented measures taken in order to deal with it, and the support those measures enjoy among the general public, are indicative of mass irrationality at best.

    My remark about being beyond help was not aimed at anyone specific here, but was a general statement.

  • Prometheus81Prometheus81 Citizen, Member

    It's unquestionable that 300,000 people have died with (not from) COVID, but the figures given above show that those people would overwhelmingly have died in any case, which makes sense given that the average age of a COVID death is 82, above national life expectancy.

  • moderator2_dormantmoderator2_dormant Moderator
    edited December 2020

    Let's not make pejorative comments regarding people's stance on this. Even if you're speaking about people in general, it still includes anyone here holding that stance.

    Also let's not make sweeping generalizations.

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